Equest Leads Nation in Horse-Assisted Therapy




As the first therapeutic riding program in Texas, Equest has become one of the largest nonprofit therapeutic riding centers in the country. It offers equine assisted therapy programs and solutions to help more than 1,200 individuals each year overcome their challenges. Equest serves children from 2 and up and adults with physical, cognitive, social/emotional learning disabilities, veterans diagnosed with post-traumatic stress disorder and more than 100 different unique disabilities and challenges.

Equest has provided equine activities and therapies in DFW for 35 years, and in 2012, began serving veterans and their family members through a variety of equine-assisted programs that include mental health counseling, physical and occupational therapy, horsemanship clinics and educational workshops. More than 300 community volunteers work each week in order to provide a safe and effective program.

Afforded optimum nutrition, exercise and a preventative care regimen that maximizes soundness and productivity, Equest therapy horses often remain on active duty for five years or longer.

Locations: Wylie (Rockwall County); and the Texas Horse Park, in South Dallas. For more information, visit Equest.org.

 

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