Coal Phase-Out Boosts Health

Benefits of Reduced Air Pollution




Kodda/Shutterstock.com

The province of Ontario began a complete phase-out of its coal-fired power plants in 2005, with all of them having closed by 2015. While the costly measure was expected to produce minor air quality improvements, officials predicted that the resulting health benefits would accrue $3 billion in annual healthcare savings for the community.

Realized savings can be seen in the drastic reduction of smog days in Ontario, down to just one since 2014. “Let’s compare that to 2005, when residents of the Greater Toronto Area suffered through 53 smog days while coal, with its toxic emissions, provided 19 percent of the province’s power,” says Vanessa Foran, president and CEO of The Asthma Society of Canada. “It’s obvious that shutting Ontario’s coal plants has helped clean the air; it’s also given a new lease on life to millions that suffer with asthma.”

More proof of the medical benefits come from an assessment conducted by Toronto Public Health in 2014. It reported a 23 percent reduction in air pollution-related premature deaths in the city between 2000 and 2011, as well as a 41 percent reduction in related hospital admissions during the same period.


This article appears in the July 2017 issue of Natural Awakenings.

Edit ModuleShow Tags

More from Natural Awakenings

An Introduction to Stem Cell Therapy

In today’s world of modern medicine, the typical recommendations of major surgery, cortisone shots and opioid supplements are taking a backseat to alternative methods that support a more holistic approach.

Metroplex Adopts United Nations Sustainable Development Goals

North Texas institutions have recently signed on to the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals, starting with Dallas County Community College system-wide adoption of goals.

Functional Medicine Respects Pet’s God-Given Lives

The natural approach to pet care involves preventing, or at least reducing, disease.

New Horizons in Stem Cell Therapy

Stem cells were first discovered in 1909, and have been of interest in medicine since the late 1960s.

A Smorgasbord of Healthcare Choices

At the Plano Health Fair, held from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m., April 22, at the Plano Event Center, participants will meet specialists licensed in Western medicine with a focus is geared toward well-being.

Add your comment: