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Farmers Responding to Climate Change




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Climate change has inspired farmers to turn to regenerative agriculture, which pulls carbon dioxide out of the atmosphere and stores it in their soil. Regenerative agriculture incorporates the practices of planting trees, cover cropping, no-till farming and rotational grazing. As the groundswell of support grows, 250 soil health bills have been introduced in state and federal legislatures in the last two years. At a U.S. Senate Agriculture Committee climate change hearing, Nebraska soybean farmer Matthew Rezac said that keeping soil healthy, not just reducing greenhouse gas emissions, was a key part of what farmers could do to cool a warming planet. According to the Union of Concerned Scientists, the bills have different justifications, but they all focus on soil health. As disastrous floods and drought sweep away farmland, the idea that regenerative agriculture could make for more productive farming is gaining traction.


This article appears in the August 2019 issue of Natural Awakenings.

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