Support Citizen Action Against Plastics




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Every minute, the equivalent of an entire garbage truck of plastic gets dumped into our oceans, reports the World Economic Forum. Many of the materials are disposable, single-use plastic products like straws, bags and Styrofoam containers, which some cities and towns have banned. This type of citizen action is increasingly blocked by the Plastic Industry Association (PIA), which has spent big money to successfully ban plastic bag ordinances in 10 states where 70 million Americans live. This means local communities are prohibited from taking effective action that could reduce the plastics that litter our streets and pollute our waterways.

The Sierra Club is calling on nine major corporations that are members of the PIA to withdraw from it with an online petition. So far, two have indicated they will not be renewing their memberships this year: Clorox (which owns companies like Burt’s Bees, Brita and Glad) and the Ascena Retail Group (which includes Ann Taylor and Loft).


To participate, sign the Sierra Club's online petition. Other action steps, including tweeting and involving friends, are also detailed.


This article appears in the April 2019 issue of Natural Awakenings.

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