Letter from Publisher




Bernice Butler

Most of us have been affected by cancer one way or another, whether it’s through the experience of a loved one, coworker, acquaintance, business associate or neighbor. I also like to think that most of us have either witnessed or heard of one or more successful healings of what I used to dub, “the big Scary”. When we investigate the many reasons to hope, we learn to actively support cancer prevention and expect the possibility of restored health.

I credit my own experience of overcoming breast cancer 10 years ago to the beginning of my journey to consciously internalize the fact that  our Creator has made the human body, as well as the Earth, to be self-healing, self-sustaining and harmonious. Part of my journey then and now involves consuming information about inferred causes and effects; the interaction of mind, body, spirit and nature; and natural counterparts to traditional medications. I’ve discovered that the most promising scientific discoveries point to using of the body’s own protective and regenerative resources; all of which confirms our Creator’s original construct.  I’ve lost my former fear of cancer and calmly remember that as master of the greatest known healing machine, I can exercise my dominion.

I was blessed to be led early on to partner with a medical facility that hosted classes in acupuncture, yoga, massage and relaxation, which I naturally took to. At the time, I didn’t comprehend that such modalities could benefit my particular healing journey. Today, only a few major oncology and other medical institutions offer such enlightened treatment.

In North Texas, we are privileged to have access to the Baylor Charles A. Sammons Cancer Center Integrative Medicine Program, which has grown tremendously over the last few years. Its Baylor Virginia R. Cvetko Patient Education & Support Center includes staff certified in complementary healing modalities such as acupuncture, relaxation protocols, yoga, guided imagery and art therapy. They advocate for an individualized approach to lifestyle, diet, exercise and mind-body medicine, integrated with convention care, to promote optimal health and healing. The frosting on this cake is that they accept most major insurance coverage.

Meanwhile, upon the advice and evidence of many experts, I remain intent on doing everything I can to reduce and eliminate personal stressors and promote optimal health of mind, body and spirit. I recently started the four-week Beginning Mindfulness class at Mastermind Meditation Center, in Dallas, and am finding that it helps me focus on bettering my practice of other elements in supporting disease prevention.

In this month’s rethinking cancer feature article, “Live Cancer-Free,” writer Linda Sechrist shares encouraging examples of cancer patient success stories and the enlightened practitioners supporting them as they’ve walked their path to healing through lifestyle, nutrition and mindfulness of crucial mind-body-soul connections. April Thompson’s complementary interview with Ellen Langer, considered the “Mother of Mindfulness”, further explains, “How Changing Our Thinking Changes Everything.”

As always, we hope you find much within these pages to enhance your life and help your journey toward an ever greener, healthier life.

Blessings always,

Bernice Butler, Publisher

 

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