Composting Yards in Winter Adds Spring Resilience




Compost is nature’s way of keeping the soil in balance. The National Compost Council recently stated, “Healthy soil is a living material, ideally filled with beneficial microorganisms, including bacteria, algae, fungi and protozoa.” These microorganisms keep soil healthy, decompose organic matter, replenish soil nutrients, form humus, promote root growth, increase nutrient uptake and break down herbicides and pesticides.

We can nurture essential microbes in our soil by adding organic matter such as mulched leaves and grass clippings when possible. Another way is to add organic compost that also contains more micro-organisms and humus. This is great for gardens, flowerbeds and lawns. Adding organic matter in winter allows time for it to be processed so soil is energized for spring.

It’s a natural process: organic matter provides food for the microorganisms in the soil that release nutrients like nitrogen into a usable form. Macro-organisms such as earthworms love organic matter, aerating the soil and adding more nutrients.

Compost has a unique ability to improve soil physically, nutritionally and biologically. It loosens up compacted soil, adds nutrients and retains moisture, so we can water less. Whether we make our own compost or buy it, to be ready to use, it should smell earthy. Add organic matter to keep the soil food web going.

For more information call Beau Propes at 469-744-0281 or email Beau@EarthKindServices.com.

 

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